Will you be switching off your lights for WWF’s Earth Hour?

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

On 30 March every year, millions of people around the world switch off their lights for an hour at 8:30pm in a pledge to help save our planet. Some of the globe’s biggest landmarks get involved in the movement too, with Australia’s Sydney Opera House, France’s Eiffel Tower and Scotland’s Edinburgh Castle all going dark for the event.

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Taking a global stand against climate change: my guest post

arid-climate-change-clouds-60013On 18 March, my article on last week’s climate change strikes went live on Rev. Rebecca Writes.

Both Rebecca and I have a passion for animals and the world we share with them, and it seems that thousands of others also share our enthusiasm in working to protect and conserve our planet for future generations. More than 2,000 protests took place around the world, stretching from North America to Asia. This landmark global movement was inspired by a 16-year-old’s passion and determination to take a stand and make her government listen.

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Celebrating World Wildlife Day 2019

Since 2013, the 3 March has been recognised as UN World Wildlife Day – a day in which the world’s wild animals and plants are celebrated with the aim of raising awareness of their existence, the benefits of conservation efforts and, quite often, the risks these animals are facing.

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Photo by Belle Co on Pexels.com

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What is climate change?

Throughout my career in magazines, I have specialised in providing hundreds and hundreds of stories on the topics I am most passionate about – animals and the planet we share with them. Within the last couple of years, I’ve noticed that climate change stories have become more frequent and I would often find myself writing about them almost every single week.

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Jaymantri.com

Now, most people know that climate change is an issue because it’s unfortunately taking a negative turn. But what is climate change?

As previously mentioned, I would frequently write about the latest climate change news, often needing to include a clear and succinct definition that was easy for eight to ten-year-olds to understand.

I recently came across this helpful BBC Radio video, which explains exactly what climate change and our carbon footprint is in 90 seconds so thought I’d share it.

On 15 February, thousands of young people across the UK ditched school to take part in a climate change strike demanding that the government take immediate action in tackling the issue. Demonstrations took place in 30 towns and cities, stretching from Cornwall all the way to the Scottish Highlands. The campaign was inspired by the actions of a 15-year-old student from Sweden, called Greta Thunberg, who misses lessons every Friday to protest outside the Swedish parliament.

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Pixabay.com

Get involved in the Great British Bee Count 2018

This year at Dennis Publishing, the company is supporting The Bumblebee Conservation Trust – a UK based charity dedicated to reversing the dramatic decline in the bumblebee population by ensuring the country is filled with suitable habitats rich in colourful wildflowers.

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uksafari.com @2009 Rosemary Lehan

Bumblebees are vital in the survival of the planet. These small striped creatures, along with other insects, are responsible for pollinating more than 80% of the crops grown for humans to eat – that’s around 400 different types of plants, including fruits, vegetables and nuts. However, our wild bee population still faces many threats from intensive farming, habitat loss and climate change.

On 17 May, Friends of the Earth launched their fifth annual Great British Bee Count. They’re encouraging the public to identify and record all of the different species of bee they spot until 30 June – of which approximately 270 have been recorded in Great Britain. To help with telling the different bees apart, Friends of the Earth have published a handy identification guide, which can be found here.